Travel Nurse

Travel Nurse

Welcome

A Travel Nurse works temporary shifts nationally and internationally. Their shifts can be as little as 4 to 13 weeks in local hospitals, or as long as 1-2 years if working overseas, and they perform the same types of duties as a normal RN. Travel nursing is perfect for nurses who like to have a constant change of scenery, and perks like housing and transportation.

Read More

A Travel Nurse works temporary shifts nationally and internationally. Their shifts can be as little as 4 to 13 weeks in local hospitals, or as long as 1-2 years if working overseas, and they perform the same types of duties as a normal RN. Travel nursing is perfect for nurses who like to have a constant change of scenery, and perks like housing and transportation.

Read Less
  • Med/surg nurses sought for dissertation research

    Posted Nov 4, 2015 by April Rowe Neal

    Capella University doctoral student, April Rowe Neal, seeks medical-surgical nurses who work with and teach nursing students for research study.

    The purpose of the study is to understand the experiences of nurses who work with nursing students in the clinical learning environment. Medical-surgical nurses who work with and teach nursing students in traditional clinicals...

    Read More

    Capella University doctoral student, April Rowe Neal, seeks medical-surgical nurses who work with and teach nursing students for research study.

    The purpose of the study is to understand the experiences of nurses who work with nursing students in the clinical learning environment. Medical-surgical nurses who work with and teach nursing students in traditional clinicals and are NOT designated as a preceptor may participate in this study. Interested parties are excluded in the event of the following: not currently licensed as an RN; employment in an outpatient, ambulatory, or specialty care area; designation as a preceptor; or any clinical association with the researcher. The study involves one 45-60 minute interview and one follow up e-mail. Volunteers may enroll by contacting April Rowe Neal by phone or e-mail.

    Contact Information:

    For more information and questions please contact:

    April Rowe Neal, MS, RN
    507-993-0630 (cell)
    aroweneal@capellauniversity.edu
    IRB-HSR # 2014-1435

    Read Less
  • Travel Nurse Opportunities Increase as Hospitals Seek to Control Costs

    Posted Dec 18, 2014 by Adam Burkhart

    By Wendi Dusseault

    As the costs to employ full time nurses continues to increase and the staffing needs of hospitals become more susceptible to numerous fluctuations, the opportunities for travel nurses increase exponentially. The fact is: hospitals can no longer afford to have FTE nurses on staff for "just in case" scenarios.

    Research indicates that it actually cost...

    Read More

    By Wendi Dusseault

    As the costs to employ full time nurses continues to increase and the staffing needs of hospitals become more susceptible to numerous fluctuations, the opportunities for travel nurses increase exponentially. The fact is: hospitals can no longer afford to have FTE nurses on staff for “just in case” scenarios.

    Research indicates that it actually costs approximately 180 percent of base wages to determine the actual investment needed to permanently employ an RN. This information was published by the Healthcare Financial Management Association.

    According to the most recent complete data available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median base pay for nurses nationwide in 2012 was $65,470 per year. That equates to an actual cost of $117,846.

    When a staff nurse goes out on maternity leave, for instance, or there is sudden, unexpected turnover, hospitals need to take immediate action to fill the vacancies. Using travel nurses helps to maintain patient load, thereby ensuring the organization’s revenue flow. Travelers are the fastest dependable source of nurses who are qualified and trained. They are the common sense approach to not only filling needs, but for cost-effective quality care and patient satisfaction.

    Natural and unexpected fluctuations staffing needs also create opportunities for travelers. For example, the annual migration of “snow birds” to warmer southern states can be forecast. However, the impact of flu season changes year-over-year nationally and in specific geographic areas, the effects of natural disasters cannot be as easily determined. But such needs, in every case, create opportunities for travel nurses where hospitals are now dedicating resources to prepare for these needs.

    Read Less
  • New Vermont State Psychiatric Hospital Relying On Traveling Nurses

    Posted Dec 9, 2014 by Adam Burkhart

    On July 2, the new Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital opened in Berlin. The $28.5 million facility is the centerpiece in the state's mental health care network that has suffered to find enough beds for psychiatric patients since Tropical Storm Irene damaged the state hospital in Waterbury almost three years previous to this opening.

    But as of just a few weeks ago, only 2...

    Read More

    On July 2, the new Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital opened in Berlin. The $28.5 million facility is the centerpiece in the state’s mental health care network that has suffered to find enough beds for psychiatric patients since Tropical Storm Irene damaged the state hospital in Waterbury almost three years previous to this opening.

    But as of just a few weeks ago, only 21 of the new care facilities’ 25 beds were available, in part because of a shortage of nurses. The new hospital was using traveling nurses to fill some of the open slots.

    Christine Ryan, the executive director and lobbyist for the Vermont State Nurses’ Association, estimates that 40 to 50 percent of the nursing workforce at the Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital is made up with traveling nurses.

    "The Berlin facility is a state facility, and I think that's going to be a challenge if you’re going to be paying state wages compensation, when nurses can get jobs in other parts of the state." - Christine Ryan, executive director and lobbyist for the Vermont State Nurses’ Association
    “From a nursing perspective, there is a Vermont nursing shortage within that facility,” she said.

    There are a couple of problems caused by this shortage: one is continuity. Although traveling nurses fill an important need in the community, their temporary presence can be disruptive to a medical facility’s community.

    “Over the long run, you’re looking to build continuity, you’re looking to build teams, you’re looking to create a strong foundation within a facility,” Ryan said. “When you have folks who are coming and going over periods of time, that is disruptive.”

    Traveling nurses also pose another concern for hospitals in terms of budgeting. The daily rate for a traveling nurse tends to be higher than that of a staff nurse due to the cost of traveling, which can lead to budgeting challenges.

    “It’s very difficult to build a budget when you have that type of influx,” she said. “You are dealing with a much higher rate for travelers than you would be for Vermont state nurses, and I think that that poses many challenges.”

    READ MORE: New State Psychiatric Hospital Relying On Traveling Nurses | Vermont Public Radio

    Read Less
  • For a Traveling Nurse, Freedom to Roam

    Posted Dec 9, 2014 by Adam Burkhart

    Monica Parks, 43, of Easley, S.C., has been working as a traveling nurse since 2007.

    Q. Why did you decide to do this for a living?

    A. Traveling nurses work in different locations for weeks at a time. I like the flexibility of being able to pick where I work and take jobs when I want. This work pays well. I get to work in different environments, and I'm not involved...

    Read More

    Monica Parks, 43, of Easley, S.C., has been working as a traveling nurse since 2007.

    Q. Why did you decide to do this for a living?

    A. Traveling nurses work in different locations for weeks at a time. I like the flexibility of being able to pick where I work and take jobs when I want. This work pays well. I get to work in different environments, and I’m not involved in the politics you might find in a staff job.

    How do you get assignments, and what about living arrangements?

    There are agencies that cater to nurses and doctors who want to travel around the country for work. I’ve had contracts that run from six or eight to 13 weeks, and they’ve often been renewed. Traveling nurses are often needed to fill in for people who are out. A hospital will either offer lodging or pay a lodging stipend so we can find our own housing.

    Doesn’t it get lonely working away from home?

    Not at all. I make friends wherever I go. I’m working in South Carolina now, so I’m close to home. But this summer I worked in Washington, D.C. There’s so much to do there, and I got together with colleagues all the time. One was from the South, like me, and had several of us over for a Lowcountry boil — corn, potatoes, shrimp, sausage and crab legs.

    What did you do before?

    I was a staff nurse in the trauma unit of a South Carolina hospital for 14 years. I felt like I saw just about everything there is to see. After that experience, I’m confident I can work in a lot of areas, but my specialties are the operating room and gastroenterology. I’m given some pretty responsible jobs. I was also at the D.C. hospital before this last assignment there, so they knew me. This summer, a nurse manager going on medical leave asked me to train three nurses on nursing fellowships.

    But aren’t you away from your family for several weeks at a time?

    That’s the beauty of this type of work: I look for contracts at hospitals and outpatient centers that aren’t too far from home. This summer, my husband and our two children, 16 and 12, stayed with me in my D.C. apartment. My husband works from home, so he was able to work when he was there. When the kids started school, I drove to South Carolina every other weekend. I do the same thing as anyone else whose job takes them out of town, or who lives in one city but works in another.

    MORE: For a Traveling Nurse, Freedom to Roam - The New York Times

    Read Less

Feedback

Have any comments or suggestions for Nurses Lounge? We would love to hear from you.
Our network provides nurse employers, schools and associations with the ability to create groups and successfully communicate news, announcements, and events seamlessly to their members.

Nurses use our network to collaborate, exchange professional advice, and share new ideas.