Trauma Nurse

Trauma Nurse

Welcome

Trauma Nurses treat patients in a state of emergency, and handle urgent situations where the cause of injury or disease isn’t yet known. They can work in hospital emergency rooms and other chaotic environments, and often need to coordinate with doctors, family members and other nurses. As a Trauma Nurse, you’ll be saving people’s lives every day.

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Trauma Nurses treat patients in a state of emergency, and handle urgent situations where the cause of injury or disease isn’t yet known. They can work in hospital emergency rooms and other chaotic environments, and often need to coordinate with doctors, family members and other nurses. As a Trauma Nurse, you’ll be saving people’s lives every day.

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  • Society of Trauma Nurses 2016 Annual Conference

    Posted Feb 10, 2016 by Garret Armes

    March 30 - April 2, 2016
    Hyatt Regency Orange County - Anaheim, California

    ABOUT THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE

    Welcome to Anaheim, California, home to the 19th Annual Society of Trauma Nurses Conference, TraumaCon, March 30 - April 2, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Orange County. Over the three-day conference, you will have the opportunity to visit with old friends, make new conn...

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    March 30 – April 2, 2016
    Hyatt Regency Orange County – Anaheim, California

    ABOUT THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE

    Welcome to Anaheim, California, home to the 19th Annual Society of Trauma Nurses Conference, TraumaCon, March 30 – April 2, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Orange County. Over the three-day conference, you will have the opportunity to visit with old friends, make new connections, and choose from a variety of high-quality educational programs designed for nurses involved in the care of trauma patients and the management of trauma programs and trauma systems. We expect an audience of more than 600 trauma nurses and nursing professionals. Read more in this brochure about the innovative programs and activities our hard-working program planning committee has in store for attendees, and make plans now to attend this highly anticipated event.

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  • Med/surg nurses sought for dissertation research

    Posted Nov 4, 2015 by April Rowe Neal

    Capella University doctoral student, April Rowe Neal, seeks medical-surgical nurses who work with and teach nursing students for research study.

    The purpose of the study is to understand the experiences of nurses who work with nursing students in the clinical learning environment. Medical-surgical nurses who work with and teach nursing students in traditional clinicals...

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    Capella University doctoral student, April Rowe Neal, seeks medical-surgical nurses who work with and teach nursing students for research study.

    The purpose of the study is to understand the experiences of nurses who work with nursing students in the clinical learning environment. Medical-surgical nurses who work with and teach nursing students in traditional clinicals and are NOT designated as a preceptor may participate in this study. Interested parties are excluded in the event of the following: not currently licensed as an RN; employment in an outpatient, ambulatory, or specialty care area; designation as a preceptor; or any clinical association with the researcher. The study involves one 45-60 minute interview and one follow up e-mail. Volunteers may enroll by contacting April Rowe Neal by phone or e-mail.

    Contact Information:

    For more information and questions please contact:

    April Rowe Neal, MS, RN
    507-993-0630 (cell)
    aroweneal@capellauniversity.edu
    IRB-HSR # 2014-1435

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  • 18th Annual Trauma Nurse Conference in Jacksonville, Florida

    Posted Jan 17, 2015 by Adam Burkhart

    18th Annual Conference
    River of Dreams: Envisioning Best Practices in Trauma Care
    March 25 - 28, 2015 | Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront
    Jacksonville, Florida

    For more info: 2015 Annual Conference

  • Captain Michelle Racicot, Army Trauma Nurse | Texas Monthly

    Posted Jan 15, 2015 by Adam Burkhart

    This article is from a few years ago, but interesting!

    My mom was an ICU nurse. After high school, I went to work as a nursing assistant with her, and I just loved it. In 1997 I joined the Army as an enlisted soldier to become a medic. The Army offered me a four-year scholarship to a private college to get my bachelor's degree and become a registered nurse. When I came...

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    This article is from a few years ago, but interesting!

    My mom was an ICU nurse. After high school, I went to work as a nursing assistant with her, and I just loved it. In 1997 I joined the Army as an enlisted soldier to become a medic. The Army offered me a four-year scholarship to a private college to get my bachelor’s degree and become a registered nurse. When I came out, in 2004, I was an officer. The first place they sent me was Germany, to Landstuhl. Then I got deployed to New Orleans for Hurricane Katrina with the 21st Combat Support Hospital. A CSH is a hospital that just packs up its gear and goes. We set up at the convention center, and I worked in the emergency department. Cardiac arrests and gunshot wounds. That’s when I fell in absolute love with the ER.

    When any patient comes in, the first thing I do is look at them from head to toe and say, “Are they breathing? Are they talking to me?” If they are, then I ask, “What does their color look like?” I don’t want them to be pale or ashy or cold, because that’s either blood loss or shock. It means their tank is not running so good. From there I put monitors on and try to get some IV access in case they need medications. It’s an algorithm, a step-by-step process that is the same with every patient. I think of it as chess. I always want to have everything planned four or five steps ahead.

    Flexibility matters too. Last March I deployed to Afghanistan with a forward surgical team, an FST. It’s an elite team, twenty people or less, that sets up on a forward operating base far from the hospital. Two OR beds. Four trauma beds. But you don’t have nice widgets. When you’re in the middle of a sandbox, sometimes your machine has been around for forty years. Sometimes it doesn’t work and you have to be able to think around it. Our FST was in eastern Afghanistan, and it was the busiest FST in the country the last three months we were there. We saw more trauma patients than all of Iraq during those months. Fifteen patients came in just on election day.

    It’s different here at Fort Sam. There I was in charge. Here I’m just another captain. I still take care of the trauma patients, but I also have surgical and medical patients, civilians from San Antonio. Here it’s chest pains or adrenal crises or diabetes, a little bit of everything. And here I get days off and can shower. I can drive a car. I don’t have to carry my weapon.

    The shifts are twelve hours. I usually take four low-acuity beds and three high-acuity beds—that’s someone who needs one-on-one attention, versus someone who has a cold. We do burns for all of Texas. They can transfer any patient to us for burns. The goal in burns is speed and cleanliness. Get them into OR as soon as possible so their burns can be debrided, the dead skin taken off and the medicine put on. We also get PTSD patients. I’ve had soldiers who have gotten drunk, warriors in transition who’ve had all this traumatic experience and now they’re at that stage in life where they’re wondering what to do. They’re easier for me to deal with because I can say, “I love you as a brother, but we gotta have a come-to-Jesus meeting right here.”

    I had a patient in Afghanistan who had been in a rollover and broken his foot. We needed to do a manual decompression on it and were giving him ketamine to consciously sedate him. He started crying and calling out for a friend. The guys with him said, “No, that’s the buddy that died the last time he was on patrol. He’s been having nightmares lately.” So you’re trying to take care of him, and the medicine makes him revisit traumatic events. We don’t want that. It’s my job to say, “He needs to see a psychiatrist.”

    READ MORE: Captain Michelle Racicot, Army Trauma Nurse | Texas Monthly

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