Neonatal Intensive Care Nurse

Neonatal Intensive Care Nurse

Welcome

Neonatal Intensive Care Nurses care for premature and critically ill newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a hospital. These babies are born needing immediate medical attention, so Neonatal Intensive Care Nurses connect them to technology that helps them breathe and allows them to be fed intravenously, so they can gain weight. As a Neonatal Intensive Care Nurse, you’ll work under the direction of a physician, caring for the newborn, and helping to educate their new mothers abo...

Read More

Neonatal Intensive Care Nurses care for premature and critically ill newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a hospital. These babies are born needing immediate medical attention, so Neonatal Intensive Care Nurses connect them to technology that helps them breathe and allows them to be fed intravenously, so they can gain weight. As a Neonatal Intensive Care Nurse, you’ll work under the direction of a physician, caring for the newborn, and helping to educate their new mothers about their baby’s condition, breastfeeding, and answering their questions.

Read Less
  • Ready to Further Your Career?

    Posted Oct 15, 2015 by Christi Retzer

    The UTMB School of Nursing is ranked as one of the Best Online Programs by US News & World Report The NNP program is for nurses who hold a BSN and have a minimum of one year nursing experience. The program is part-time and provide flexibility. The NNP major is a 46 credit hour program (including the core courses) that prepares registered nurses to provide advanced nursing...

    Read More

    The UTMB School of Nursing is ranked as one of the Best Online Programs by US News & World Report The NNP program is for nurses who hold a BSN and have a minimum of one year nursing experience. The program is part-time and provide flexibility. The NNP major is a 46 credit hour program (including the core courses) that prepares registered nurses to provide advanced nursing care to critically ill and recovering neonates and their families. All courses are offered online; clinical courses involve a trip to the Galveston campus once per clinical semester. The major includes 780 clinical hours; and clinical experiences usually may be completed in the student’s geographic area. A minimum of two years of recent experience as a registered nurse in a Level III nursery is required. Applications are currently open and will close on March 15, 2016. Please see the UTMB School of Nursing website for more information: MSN
    Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Degree | UTMB School of Nursing in Galveston, Texas
    http://www.usnews.com/education/onl...

    Read Less
  • Google Glass helps mother and child bond in NICU

    Posted Jan 16, 2015 by Cam Brown
  • National Advanced Practice Neonatal Nurses Conference

    Posted Jan 16, 2015 by Garret Armes

    Join us in Chicago!

    You name it; Chicago's got the best! Few cities in the world can match the character and culture of Chicago. Not only is Chicago conveniently located for travel from anywhere in the U.S., Canada, and abroad, but this is a city with more choices in food, museums, music, shopping, and fun than most any other city.

  • Medscape: The Missed List: Revelations of Busy NICU Nurses

    Posted Jan 13, 2015 by Cam Brown

    A Descriptive Study of Nurse-Reported Missed Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units
    Tubbs-Cooley HL, Pickler RH, Younger JB, Mark BA

    What Is Missed Care and Does It Matter?

    Previous nursing research has established that nurse staffing levels and nurse-to-patient ratios influence patient outcomes, and "missed" nursing care is believed to be a mediator in this relations...

    Read More

    A Descriptive Study of Nurse-Reported Missed Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units
    Tubbs-Cooley HL, Pickler RH, Younger JB, Mark BA

    What Is Missed Care and Does It Matter?

    Previous nursing research has established that nurse staffing levels and nurse-to-patient ratios influence patient outcomes, and "missed" nursing care is believed to be a mediator in this relationship.[1] A nurse can only do so much during a shift, regardless of the setting.

    Previous studies of missed care (necessary nursing care that is omitted either entirely or partly during the shift) have focused on adults in acute or intensive care settings, finding that such nursing tasks as ambulation, turning, feedings, patient teaching, discharge planning, emotional support, oral hygiene, bathing, and comfort care are among those most often sacrificed when time runs short.[2] These are concrete missed tasks, but overstretched nurses also may be unable to provide adequate surveillance of and appropriate response to changing patient conditions. Their interactions with patients and families can be rushed and unsatisfactory, and tasks may be performed less carefully or thoroughly than is customary.

    READ MORE: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle...

    Read Less
  • High demand - Neonatal Intensive Care!

    Posted Aug 28, 2014 by Charles Gebig

Feedback

Have any comments or suggestions for Nurses Lounge? We would love to hear from you.
Our network provides nurse employers, schools and associations with the ability to create groups and successfully communicate news, announcements, and events seamlessly to their members.

Nurses use our network to collaborate, exchange professional advice, and share new ideas.