University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing

Welcome

Welcome to the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing.  Professional nursing continues to be a rewarding lifetime career with many opportunities for advancement. As the challenges and demands in health care intensify, the demand for an educated nursing workforce increases. Since 1950, the UAB School of Nursing has been building on a vision to sustain nursing leadership worldwide.

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Welcome to the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing.  Professional nursing continues to be a rewarding lifetime career with many opportunities for advancement. As the challenges and demands in health care intensify, the demand for an educated nursing workforce increases. Since 1950, the UAB School of Nursing has been building on a vision to sustain nursing leadership worldwide.

CONTACT
1720 Second Avenue South
Birmingham, AL 35294-1210
Phone: 205-934-5428
School Type

BS/BSN School

Class Room Settings

Campus and Online

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  • Alumna is new nursing dean at Tuskegee University

    Posted Mar 8, 2018 by Jennifer Lollar

    By Laura Lesley
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing alumna Constance Smith Hendricks, PhD, RN, FAAN, was appointed as the new dean of the School of Nursing and Allied Health at Tuskegee University, effective Jan. 2, 2018.

    Tuskegee University is home to the state of Alabama's first baccalaureate degree in nursing program, established in 1948 by Dr...

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    By Laura Lesley
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing alumna Constance Smith Hendricks, PhD, RN, FAAN, was appointed as the new dean of the School of Nursing and Allied Health at Tuskegee University, effective Jan. 2, 2018.

    Tuskegee University is home to the state of Alabama’s first baccalaureate degree in nursing program, established in 1948 by Dr. Lillian Holland Harvey.

    Previously, Hendricks served as the founding dean of the Division of Health Sciences at Concordia College, as well as 17 years in the Auburn University School of Nursing where she was the Charles W. Barkley Endowed Professor.

    “My goal at Tuskegee is to grow the School of Nursing and Allied Health’s enrollment, programs and, of course external funding,” Hendricks said.

    Hendricks received the UAB School of Nursing Distinguished Alumni Award in 2007. She is a two-time graduate of the School, earning her Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degrees in 1974 and 1981, respectively. In 2016, she established the Dr. Constance Smith Hendricks Endowed Scholarship in Nursing together with family and friends to support deserving UAB School of Nursing students.

    The UAB School of Nursing is ranked 13th in overall graduate programs, among the top five public schools of nursing in the country by U.S. News and World Report, and offers innovative bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs, including the state’s only PhD in Nursing degree and a DNP degree offering BSN, MSN and Nurse Anesthesia Pathways; more than 10 specialty nurse practitioner tracks, advanced nursing executive majors in administration and informatics, and an Accelerated Master's in Nursing Pathway (AMNP) for students who already have one degree.

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  • Alumni team up against opioids

    Posted Mar 5, 2018 by Jennifer Lollar

    By Laura Lesley

    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing alumni Jody White, DNP, RN, NE-BC, and Becky Langner, MSN, RN, are on first and second-place winning teams, respectively, at InnoHack 2018, which challenges health care professionals and students across disciplines to work together to solve a critical health care issue - with this year's biggest...

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    By Laura Lesley

    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing alumni Jody White, DNP, RN, NE-BC, and Becky Langner, MSN, RN, are on first and second-place winning teams, respectively, at InnoHack 2018, which challenges health care professionals and students across disciplines to work together to solve a critical health care issue – with this year’s biggest health care issue currently facing Alabama being the opioid epidemic.

    For the competition, 80 participants are randomly divided into 16 teams, to “hack” the crisis for 24 hours. After a preliminary round of judging, the top teams face off in the finals.

    White’s first-place team earned a $2,500 prize to share, and Langner’s second-place team earned $1,500 to share.

    “Our winning idea was the adoption of an ‘Opioid Safe Rescue Process,’” said White. “Much like we have a universal sign for choking, it was noted that we do not have anything in place that brings a rescue process to the top of our minds when we see a drug overdose.

    “A symbol for ‘Opioid Safe Rescue’ could also be adopted in key communities where opioid deaths are occurring. The sign would indicate that Narcan, a reversal drug, is available there for immediate use.”

    White notes that, in addition, this sign could be used by hospitals, physician offices, pharmacies, and other locations that are equipped to offer the reversal medication to anyone who needs it.

    Two of the best parts, White said, is that the winning ideas from InnoHack 2018 are now being considered for implementation by health care organizations across Jefferson County, and that nurses made a significant impact on those ideas.

    “Becky and I celebrated that nurses were on both winning teams, illustrating the important role nurses play in real-world problem-solving scenarios,” said White.

    The Innohack annual event is sponsored by the UAB Schools of Nursing, Public Health, Medicine and Health Professions and Brookwood Baptist Health.

    White earned his Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees from the UAB School of Nursing in 2006 and 2011, respectively.

    Langner earned her MSN degrees from the UAB School of Nursing in 1979 and 2013, respectively. She is Publicity Chair for the School’s Nu Chapter of Sigma.

    The UAB School of Nursing is ranked 13th in overall graduate programs, among the top five public schools of nursing in the country by U.S. News and World Report, and offers innovative bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs, including the state’s only PhD in Nursing degree and a DNP degree offering BSN, MSN and Nurse Anesthesia Pathways; more than 10 specialty nurse practitioner tracks, advanced nursing executive majors in administration and informatics, and an Accelerated Master's in Nursing Pathway (AMNP) for students who already have one degree.

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  • Harris leading pediatric MS cognition research

    Posted Feb 22, 2018 by Jennifer Lollar

    By Jimmy Creed
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing Instructor Yolanda Harris, MSN, CRNP, CPNP-AC, wants to know how Multiple Sclerosis (MS) impacts decision-making in children.

    Harris has been named principal investigator by the UAB Center for Pediatric Onset Demyelinating Disease at Children's Hospital of a $56,695 grant to study this relatively...

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    By Jimmy Creed
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing Instructor Yolanda Harris, MSN, CRNP, CPNP-AC, wants to know how Multiple Sclerosis (MS) impacts decision-making in children.

    Harris has been named principal investigator by the UAB Center for Pediatric Onset Demyelinating Disease at Children’s Hospital of a $56,695 grant to study this relatively unexplored area. The grant is part of a larger multi-site grant from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to New York University and the Network of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Centers (NPMSC).

    “This study is the first of its kind, looking at how pediatric-onset MS affects cognition in children,” Harris said. “The goal is to identify what may be the challenges for these children and use that information to develop interventions to help improve their cognitive skills as they grow older.”

    Using a battery of cognitive tests to study processing speed, the rate at which a person processes information from start to finish, Harris wants to develop a better understanding of cognitive decline and evaluations that could provide key insights for the future.

    “We want to learn all we can so we can help these children be productive members of society as they move forward,” Harris said.

    More cognitive effects in children
    Working within the framework of a protocol called Cognition and Neurodevelopmental Influence (CANDI), researchers are examining 150 children with MS ages 10 to 16 and 100 healthy children in the same age group. The NPMSC is also recruiting 100 adults ages 25 to 46 whose MS was diagnosed at 21 or later and who have had the disease for up to 10 years.

    Subjects take information-processing tests that provide measures of simple reaction time, choice reaction time, which determines general alertness, working memory and social cognition. Subjects also provide information on IQ, how long they have had the disease and disease activity to help researchers assess predictors of cognitive processing speed.

    “We know that pediatric MS patients have more cognitive effects than physical effects, and this study is bringing insight into how much the disease contributes to their cognitive issues,” Harris said. “Understanding and evaluating these measures of cognitive risk in the pediatric-onset MS population also helps care providers determine whether patients will benefit most from more conservative or more aggressive disease management at a given point in time.”

    Unique opportunity in nursing
    As a bedside nurse in the Special Care Unit, an intensive care step-down unit at Children’s of Alabama, for five years before setting out to become a Nurse Practitioner, Harris developed a keen interest in how chronic illnesses, such as MS and others, affect families. For the last four years, her dissertation topic, “A Qualitative Descriptive Study Exploring the Adaptation of Families of Children with Multiple Sclerosis from the Perspective of Caregivers,” as a student in the School’s Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (PhD) Program, has focused on how MS impacts families as a whole.

    Now, as part of the UAB Center for Pediatric Onset Demyelinating Disease, Harris is leading the effort to help chronically ill children with MS and their families from Alabama and seven other Southeastern states.

    “I am the only nurse involved in the committee overseeing this and many other projects among the 15 NPMSC partners nationally, and I am one of the original nurses that has worked at one of the original centers from the beginning in 2006,” Harris said. “To be a nurse and be part of a nationwide organization that is looking at how MS is affecting outcomes for children in clinical and social settings is a unique opportunity and one that is very special to me.”

    Harris earned her Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) from the School in 2006.
    The UAB School of Nursing is ranked 13th in overall graduate programs, among the top five public schools of nursing in the country by U.S. News and World Report, and offers innovative bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs, including the state’s only PhD in Nursing degree. Based at the state’s flagship Academic Health Science Center with the third largest public hospital in the nation, the School is a leader and trendsetter in collaborative science and home to the state’s only nursing-specific research initiative with a diverse funding portfolio, including more than $9.7 million in NIH research funding, supporting scholarship in oncology, international nursing, HIV/AIDS, pediatrics, occupational health, aging, among others.

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  • Alumnus leading men in nursing

    Posted Feb 20, 2018 by Jennifer Lollar

    By Laura Lesley
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing alumnus Blake Smith, MSN, BS, RN, is President-Elect of the American Association for Men in Nursing, which shapes practice, education, research, and leadership for men in nursing. At 32 years old, he will be the youngest president in the 44-year history of the association.

    Smith, a Clinical Docu...

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    By Laura Lesley
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing alumnus Blake Smith, MSN, BS, RN, is President-Elect of the American Association for Men in Nursing, which shapes practice, education, research, and leadership for men in nursing. At 32 years old, he will be the youngest president in the 44-year history of the association.

    Smith, a Clinical Documentation Senior Analyst for Nebraska Medicine, was recently featured in a POLITICO video promoting the nursing profession as a premier choice for men.

    Blake Smith presentation headshot“Men should consider going into the nursing profession because it is one of high reward and integrity,” he said in the interview. “The reason I went into nursing is because I am searching for something that is going to be fulfilling, where I can give back to the community. Nursing is one of those professions.”

    In addition to his national leadership in men’s health awareness and advocacy and male inclusion in the nursing profession, Smith serves on the Nebraska Action Coalition’s Diversity Task Force and Leadership Committee. He is also the first chair of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) National Scholar Network Steering Committee.

    He said he chose the UAB School of Nursing for its combination of faculty, superior curriculum and culture.

    “UAB develops future nurse leaders through innovative teaching methods that simulate real world scenarios,” he said. “They understand that the current generation of nursing students learn by doing, not watching or listening.

    “To be a nurse leader in today’s health care world, you must have a combination of business and nursing expertise, along with true understanding of the power of professional interdisciplinary approaches to be successful in solving complex health issues,” he adds. “UAB is that innovative university—understanding that for nursing to keep up with the ever-changing needs of our communities, we must seek out individuals to lead with character and integrity, and not by gender or race.”

    Smith earned his Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree in Nursing Health Systems Administration from the UAB School of Nursing in 2017. He received the 2017 Outstanding Graduate Student Award and was a senator for the Nursing Graduate Student Association during his time as a graduate student.

    The UAB School of Nursing is ranked 13th in overall graduate programs, among the top five public schools of nursing in the country by U.S. News and World Report, and offers innovative bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs, including the state’s only PhD in Nursing degree and a DNP degree offering BSN, MSN and Nurse Anesthesia Pathways; more than 10 specialty nurse practitioner tracks, advanced nursing executive majors in administration and informatics, and an Accelerated Master's in Nursing Pathway (AMNP) for students who already have one degree.

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  • Fogger honored by addiction society

    Posted Feb 13, 2018 by Jennifer Lollar

    Professor Susanne Fogger, DNP, CRNP, CARN-AP, PMHNP-BC, FAANP, has received the President's Award for Service from the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) to recognize years of contributions to the organization.

    Fogger has been a member of IntNSA for more than 13 years and has served as Chair of the Abstract Review and Research Award Committee, Secretar...

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    Professor Susanne Fogger, DNP, CRNP, CARN-AP, PMHNP-BC, FAANP, has received the President’s Award for Service from the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) to recognize years of contributions to the organization.

    Fogger has been a member of IntNSA for more than 13 years and has served as Chair of the Abstract Review and Research Award Committee, Secretary of the Board of Directors and was recently elected Treasurer.

    She was presented the award at the group’s 41st Annual Education Conference in Orlando.

    Fogger, a 12-year veteran of the United States Air Force Nurse Corps as a psychiatric nurse, teaches in the School’s Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Specialty Track. She is a content expert for addictions and substance abuse and clinical faculty at the 1917 Clinic, UAB’s comprehensive AIDS treatment and research center, treating individuals with psychiatric and substance disorders.

    The UAB School of Nursing is ranked 13th in overall graduate programs, among the top five public schools in the country by U.S. News & World Report, and two of its specialties were ranked on reputation - Nursing Administration is listed 6th and Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner 18th. The MSN program features more than 10 specialty tracks, including nurse practitioner options, clinical nurse leader, nursing education, nursing informatics, and nursing health administration. Two options, RN to MSN and the Accelerated Master's in Nursing Pathway, provide those with a bachelor's degree in another area an entry into the nursing profession. The MSN also prepares graduates for entry into doctoral studies in nursing in either the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) or Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (PhD) program.

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  • Enhancing health care quality, safety

    Posted Feb 5, 2018 by Jennifer Lollar

    By Jimmy Creed
    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing has been tapped by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) Institute to be part of a national effort to increase quality and safety education for nurses at all levels through the development of regional educational outreach hubs.

    The Collaborative's objective is to train nurse educ...

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    By Jimmy Creed
    The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing has been tapped by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) Institute to be part of a national effort to increase quality and safety education for nurses at all levels through the development of regional educational outreach hubs.

    The Collaborative’s objective is to train nurse educators, practicing nurses, and nurse leaders on the importance of instilling quality and safety values within today’s nursing and health care workforce.

    Rachel Z. Booth Endowed Chair in Nursing and Professor Patrician A. Patrician, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Associate Professor Rebecca S. Miltner, PhD, RN, CNL, NEA-BC, are leading the new initiative at UAB, called the Deep South QSEN Regional Collaborative.

    “We know there is much as a School we can impart, as leaders in quality and safety education and research, to the many health care professionals in Alabama and the Deep South about QSEN and the importance of being proficient in quality and safety principles,” Patrician said. “This includes addressing the challenges of preparing all nurses with the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to become leaders in interprofessional health care teams to help continuously improve the quality and safety of the health care systems in which they practice.”

    This educational outreach is based on six main QSEN competencies, including evidence-based practice, quality improvement, patient safety, patient-centered care, informatics, and teamwork and collaboration.

    “When you ask nurses about quality and safety, they will often say ‘That’s everything we do,’” Patrician said. “But if you ask them about changes in practice based on evidence they’ve seen, research literature they have read, or patient-care issues they have discussed with their colleagues, you find that they aren’t incorporating those things as they should. We want to change that.”

    Patrician said the overall goals of the Collaborative include strengthening QSEN knowledge in nursing faculty throughout Alabama through professional development offerings; serving as expert quality and safety consultants in nursing education and practice; and leading other quality and safety education and practice initiatives in the Deep South.

    “A few of us across the nation are directly assisting the efforts of the QSEN Institute, and one of those is to increase its impact nationally by regionalizing it,” Patrician said. “Instead of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, being the only place where QSEN activities were taking place, we decided to have regional centers across the county. Dr. Miltner and I saw the need in Alabama and took the lead in this effort by setting up the Deep South Regional Collaborative here.”

    Patrician and Miltner both currently serve on the QSEN Board of Directors. The Deep South Regional Collaborative in the UAB School of Nursing is the fourth nationally. The others are located at Jacksonville University in Jacksonville, Florida, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The College of New Jersey in Ewing, New Jersey.
    The UAB School of Nursing is ranked 13th in overall graduate programs, among the top five public schools of nursing in the country by U.S. News and World Report, and offers innovative bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs, including the state’s only PhD in Nursing degree and a DNP degree offering BSN, MSN and Nurse Anesthesia Pathways; more than 10 specialty nurse practitioner tracks, advanced nursing executive majors in administration and informatics, and an Accelerated Master's in Nursing Pathway (AMNP) for students who already have one degree.

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  • Holland a national voice for women's health

    Posted Feb 1, 2018 by Jennifer Lollar

    By Jimmy Creed
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing Associate Professor Aimee Holland, DNP, CRNP, WHNP-BC, NP-C, RD, FAANP, has been appointed chair of the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women's Health (NPWH) Board of Directors.

    As chair, she will be NPWH's voice for women's health, impacting health policy and clinical practice.

    ... Read More

    By Jimmy Creed
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing Associate Professor Aimee Holland, DNP, CRNP, WHNP-BC, NP-C, RD, FAANP, has been appointed chair of the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women’s Health (NPWH) Board of Directors.

    As chair, she will be NPWH’s voice for women’s health, impacting health policy and clinical practice.

    “It is exciting to have the opportunity to move women’s health issues forward at a national level,” Holland said.

    During her two-year term, Holland will also serve on the editorial board of the NPWH’s journal, Women’s Healthcare: A Clinical Journal for Nurse Practitioners.

    For Holland, director of the School’s Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program, the appointment fulfills a career goal.

    “I have always wanted to be the chair of NPWH,” she said. “And, it is an honor to represent the UAB School of Nursing and the great team we have here.”

    Holland, who earned her DNP from the School in 2012, has been a member of the NPWH Board of Directors since 2013, and has served as chair of its Research Committee and National Conference. She also is on the NPWH Policy Committee and Executive Committee, writes white papers and position statements for the organization, and represents NPWH at other national organizations’ meetings, including the American Nurses Association (ANA) and American Society for Colposcopy and Clinical Pathology (ASCCP), the Society of Lower Genital Tract Disorders.

    Her term began on Jan. 1, 2018.

    The School’s DNP program, ranked 18th nationally by U.S. News & World Report, is a practice-focused terminal degree to prepare graduates to practice at the highest level in specialty practice or to assume leadership positions in health care or nursing education.

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  • Alumna earns Sigma mentorship award

    Posted Jan 31, 2018 by Jennifer Lollar

    By Laura Lesley
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing alumna Elizabeth A. Carlson, PhD, has received the Lucie S. Kelly Mentor Award from Sigma Theta Tau International, the honor society for nursing.

    Carlson was presented the award at Sigma's 44th Biennial Convention on Oct. 30, 2017, in Indianapolis, Indiana.

    Carlson, Professor and Chair of th...

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    By Laura Lesley
    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing alumna Elizabeth A. Carlson, PhD, has received the Lucie S. Kelly Mentor Award from Sigma Theta Tau International, the honor society for nursing.

    Carlson was presented the award at Sigma’s 44th Biennial Convention on Oct. 30, 2017, in Indianapolis, Indiana.

    Carlson, Professor and Chair of the department of adult health and gerontological nursing in the Rush University College of Nursing in Chicago, earned her Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree from the UAB School of Nursing in 1976.

    In 2016, Carlson received the Marie O’Koren Alumni Award for Innovation in Leadership from the School. Her history of sustained contributions to teaching, practice and research includes her instrumental work in the development of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program at Rush University. Together with colleagues, she is currently studying DNP-PhD collaboration and the role it plays in advancing nursing as a profession.

    The UAB School of Nursing is ranked 13th in overall graduate programs, among the top five public schools of nursing in the country by U.S. News and World Report, and offers innovative bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs, including the state’s only PhD in Nursing degree and a DNP degree offering BSN, MSN and Nurse Anesthesia Pathways; more than 10 specialty nurse practitioner tracks, advanced nursing executive majors in administration and informatics, and an Accelerated Master's in Nursing Pathway (AMNP) for students who already have one degree.

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  • Wilson leading health informatics

    Posted Jan 30, 2018 by Jennifer Lollar

    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing Associate Professor Marisa L. Wilson, DNSc, MHSc, RN-BC, CPHIMS, FAAN, has been elected to a two-year term on the Board of Directors of The Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM).

    Wilson, coordinator of the School's Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Nur...

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    University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing Associate Professor Marisa L. Wilson, DNSc, MHSc, RN-BC, CPHIMS, FAAN, has been elected to a two-year term on the Board of Directors of The Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM).

    Wilson, coordinator of the School’s Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Nursing Informatics Specialty Track, began serving on Jan. 1, 2018.

    CAHIIM is an independent, non-profit organization that serves the public interest by establishing quality accreditation standards for health informatics and health information management educational programs, awards accreditation to programs that achieve these standards and provides effective and consistent quality monitoring while supporting innovation and diversity in higher education. CAHIIM is a recognized accreditation organization by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

    The UAB School of Nursing is ranked 13th in overall graduate programs, among the top five public schools in the country by U.S. News & World Report, and two of its specialties were ranked on reputation - Nursing Administration is listed 6th and Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner 18th. The MSN program features more than 10 specialty tracks, including nurse practitioner options, clinical nurse leader, nursing education, nursing informatics, and nursing health administration. Two options, RN to MSN and the Accelerated Master's in Nursing Pathway, provide those with a bachelor's degree in another area an entry into the nursing profession. The MSN also prepares graduates for entry into doctoral studies in nursing in either the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) or Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (PhD) program.

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  • 100% first-time pass rate for nurse anesthesia

    Posted Jan 24, 2018 by Jennifer Lollar

    By Laura Lesley
    The 2017 graduating class of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Nurse Anesthesia Specialty Track has achieved a 100 percent first-time pass rate on the National Certification Exam (NCE) administered by the National Board of Certification & Recertification for Nurse Anesthetists exam.

    The 201...

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    By Laura Lesley
    The 2017 graduating class of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Nursing Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Nurse Anesthesia Specialty Track has achieved a 100 percent first-time pass rate on the National Certification Exam (NCE) administered by the National Board of Certification & Recertification for Nurse Anesthetists exam.

    The 2017 national average for those taking the exam to pass on their first time to take it is 82.6 percent, making the UAB Nurse Anesthesia Class of 2017’s accomplishment particularly impressive.

    “These students wanted to achieve a 100 percent first-time board pass. It was hard, challenging and committed work, but they put their heart and soul into it,” said Associate Professor and Specialty Track Coordinator Susan McMullan, PhD, CRNA. “Their effort certainly paid off.”

    McMullan, who joined the faculty in early 2015, and her nurse anesthesia colleagues in the School, Assistant Professor and Assistant Program Director Todd Hicks, DNP, MNA, CRNA, Assistant Professor Bryan Wilbanks, DNP, CRNA, Assistant Professor Edwin Aroke, PhD, MSN, CRNA, and Instructor Kaitlen Woodfin, MSN, CRNA collaborated to update the curriculum and adjust board review materials to ensure success on the NCE exam.

    “Many adjustments were made, and we worked hard to improve the rigor of the curriculum,” said McMullan. “Ultimately, the students did the work, and their exam results demonstrate their dedication and motivation.”

    McMullan notes: “They are a really cohesive group. And I’m proud to share that they all have all secured desirable positions and will be employed within three months of graduation.”

    This is one of the last cohorts in the School to graduate with an MSN in Nurse Anesthesia. The Nurse Anesthesia Pathway is now a component of the School’s Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program. It received accreditation from The Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthetists (COA) in November 2016 and the first cohort of 39 BSN-to-DNP students began their program of study in May 2017.

    The UAB School of Nursing is ranked 13th in overall graduate programs, among the top five public schools of nursing in the country by U.S. News and World Report, and offers innovative bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs, including the state’s only PhD in Nursing degree and a DNP degree offering BSN, MSN and Nurse Anesthesia Pathways; more than 10 specialty nurse practitioner tracks, advanced nursing executive majors in administration and informatics, and an Accelerated Master's in Nursing Pathway (AMNP) for students who already have one degree.

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