Utah Nursing Network

Utah Nursing Network

Welcome

Nursing In Utah

There were 24,370 RNs with active licenses issued by the state of Utah as of January 31, 2011.
Of these, 81% (19,753) work in healthcare in Utah. Another 12% (3,044) of these are working in
non-healthcare jobs in Utah and 6% (1,573) are not working in Utah.


From 1989 to 2004 the State of Utah issued an average of 1,200 RN licenses per year. From
2005 to 2010 the average has increased to 1,883 licenses per year.


The largest percentage of RNs (26%) receive their RN lice...

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Nursing In Utah

There were 24,370 RNs with active licenses issued by the state of Utah as of January 31, 2011.
Of these, 81% (19,753) work in healthcare in Utah. Another 12% (3,044) of these are working in
non-healthcare jobs in Utah and 6% (1,573) are not working in Utah.


From 1989 to 2004 the State of Utah issued an average of 1,200 RN licenses per year. From
2005 to 2010 the average has increased to 1,883 licenses per year.


The largest percentage of RNs (26%) receive their RN license between the age of 25-29 years of
age. In addition, 20% of Utah’s RNs working in healthcare are over 55 years of age.


Only 50% of all RN licenses issued 20 years ago are still active today. Through the age of 55,
regardless of the age of an RN when a license is issued, an average of 49% of licenses have
expired within 10 years of being issued. An average of 11% of RN licenses issued each year are
not renewed after the first licensing period. An average of 30% of RN licenses issued each year
are not renewed after three licensing periods.


There could be a wide variety of explanations for these occurrences, from RN’s possibly leaving
the state or moving into an advanced practice role or RN’s deciding to focus on raising a family
with the intention of later returning to the workforce. There may also be the possibility of a
tendency toward professional burnout within 10 years. These trends warrant further
investigation, including comparison to the license expiration trends of APRNs, PAs and
Physicians.


Since 2005, an average of 1,563 RN licenses have expired in each 2-year license cycle (781
expirations per year). Given the average 1,881 new licenses issued per year, this results in a net
growth of 1,100 licenses per year. An average of 31% (242) of expired licenses per year can be
attributed to retirement (over age 55).


According to the DWS Occupational Report for RNs an inexperienced RN in Utah earns an
average income of $48,530 per year. An experienced RN earns an average income of $59,420.
UMEC wage analysis by healthcare work setting shows that the highest paid Utah RNs work in
Insurance Activities and Administration/Government Support settings. These settings also have
the largest percentage of their workforce above 55 years of age. Additionally, 60% of Utah’s RN
workforce works in a hospital setting.


There is a high demand for RN training in Utah. In the 2012 academic year there were 3,591
qualified applicants for 2,172 positions in Utah’s training programs. About 40% (1,419) of
qualified applicants to Utah training programs were not accepted.


RN training programs in Utah graduated a total of 1,669 students in the 2010-11 school year.
This is equal to 77% of the number of students accepted. Utah’s RN training programs have an
average pass rate of 85.4% on the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). This means
that approximately 1,425 graduates from Utah’s RN training programs passed the exam to
receive their RN license. This equates to 65.6% of all Utah RN program enrollees passing a
licensure exam after completion of a degree.


An average of 1,883 new RN licenses are issued annually in the state of Utah. If 81% of these
licenses are working in healthcare in Utah, then we will have 1,525 new RNs in our workforce
each year. Our state training programs graduate about 1,425 NCLEX certified RNs each year. If
all of these graduates are getting a Utah license, it is likely that Utah’s training programs are
within 100 RNs per year of Utah’s entire annual supply of RNs.

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  • Intermountain Healthcare and BYU College of Nursing Collaborative Research Conference

    Posted Jul 15, 2016 by Sean Bennett

    Intermountain Healthcare and BYU College of Nursing Collaborative Research Conference.
    November 7, 2016
    Provo, UT


    CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
    "Nursing Evidence for Leadership and Change"

    The Brigham Young University College of Nursing and Intermountain Healthcare invite submission of abstracts to be considered for podium or poster presentations at the Collaborative Research Confere...

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    Intermountain Healthcare and BYU College of Nursing Collaborative Research Conference.
    November 7, 2016
    Provo, UT


    CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
    “Nursing Evidence for Leadership and Change”

    The Brigham Young University College of Nursing and Intermountain Healthcare invite submission of abstracts to be considered for podium or poster presentations at the Collaborative Research Conference, to be held November 7, 2016 at Brigham Young University. Abstracts of completed projects, including nursing research, educational strategies, clinical practice innovations, ethical issues, or practical nursing issues will be considered. The conference theme is “Nursing Evidence for Leadership and Change.”


    GENERAL INFORMATION

    Submission Deadline
    Abstracts must be received by 11:59 p.m. on Friday, September 9, 2016.

    Abstract Selection and Notification

    The Conference Committee will review and select abstracts for podium and poster presentations. If your abstract is accepted for presentation, you will be notified via email by September 16, 2016. Detailed guidelines for podium presentations and posters will be provided with the acceptance e-mail including the assigned time and location of the presentation. If the abstract has more than one author, the contact person is asked to share the information with the other author(s).


    ABSTRACT SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

    E-Mail abstracts to:

    Cherie Top
    BYU College of Nursing
    Administrative Services
    Graduate Programs and Research
    e-mail: cherie-top@byu.edu


    ABSTRACT PREPARATION

    Abstracts should be single spaced with 1” margins, and limited to 400 words. The abstract should include a statement of preference for podium, poster, or either podium or poster.

    a. Research abstracts should include:
    • Title
    • Author(s) (including e-mail of first author)
    • Purpose
    • Research question(s) / hypotheses
    • Methodology: setting, sample, design, instruments, procedures, data analysis
    • Findings
    • Implications for Nursing
    • Conclusion
    b. Clinical project abstracts should include:
    • Title
    • Author(s) (including e-mail of first author)
    • Purpose
    • Description and evaluation of project
    • Implications for Nursing
    • Conclusion
    c. Education project abstracts should include
    • Title
    • Authors (including e-mail of first author)
    • Purpose
    • Description and evaluation of strategy or project
    • Implications for Nursing
    • Conclusion

    d. Time allotted for podium presentation depends on the number of abstracts accepted. Maximum time is 20 minutes which includes a 5-minute question-answer period.
    e. Guidelines for posters will be provided with the acceptance e-mail. Awards will be given to the top posters in each of the 3 categories; research, clinical practice, and education.
    f. If you have questions contact:

    Karen J. Whitt, PhD, FNP-C, AGN-BC
    Chair, Scholarly Works Council
    Brigham Young University College of Nursing
    e-mail: Karen_Whitt@byu.edu

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  • Utah Simulation Coalition Kickoff

    Posted Jul 15, 2016 by Sean Bennett

    Date: August 10, 2016
    Time: 6:oo-8:00 PM
    Place: Salt Lake Community College

    Security Check Required

  • 14th Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference "Embracing Geriatric Complexity: Applying Assessment Tools in Multidisciplinary Environments”

    Posted Jul 15, 2016 by Sean Bennett

    Save the Date - August 29-30, 2016

    Make your plans now to attend;

    14th Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference: "Embracing Geriatric Complexity: Applying Assessment Tools in Multidisciplinary Environments"


    This Year's Conference Will be Held at the Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort, by Salt Lake City, Utah

    Presented By: Division of Geriatrics, University of Utah, Schoo...

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    Save the Date – August 29-30, 2016

    Make your plans now to attend;

    14th Annual Rocky Mountain Geriatrics Conference: "Embracing Geriatric Complexity: Applying Assessment Tools in Multidisciplinary Environments”


    This Year’s Conference Will be Held at the Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort, by Salt Lake City, Utah

    Presented By: Division of Geriatrics, University of Utah, School of Medicine

    Conference information, as it becomes available, can be found at: http://medicine.utah.edu/internalme... or if you have conference questions, please contact Jack Christensen at (801)582-1565 x2435 or jack.christensen@utah.edu.

    VA Attendee, Special Information:

    • This event has been added to the VHA ACES. Access the following (ACES) public link to pre-register for this event.

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  • Reasoning with Unreasonable People: Focus on Disorders of Emotional Regulation

    Posted Apr 20, 2016 by Sean Bennett

    In this six-hour program, health professionals will learn how people reason with selected disorders of mood, anxiety, OCD, anger, and personality. Practical strategies will be presented to facilitate meaningful change in patients and health professionals working in medical, dental, and behavioral health settings.

    Participants completing this program should be able to:...

    Read More

    In this six-hour program, health professionals will learn how people reason with selected disorders of mood, anxiety, OCD, anger, and personality. Practical strategies will be presented to facilitate meaningful change in patients and health professionals working in medical, dental, and behavioral health settings.

    Participants completing this program should be able to:
    1. List several paths to achieving effective emotional communication.
    2. Outline an effective strategy to reason with a person who has a disorder of mood, anxiety, OCD, anger, or personality.
    3. Describe a strategy for reasoning or having a difficult conversation with a person who is experiencing pain, illness or vulnerability.
    4. Describe a calming strategy including the practice of mindfulness for health professionals who are experiencing strong emotions.

    Friday May 6, 2016 - 8:15 AM
    Salt Lake City, UT
    https://www.ibpceu.com

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  • Reasoning with Unreasonable People: Focus on Disorders of Emotional Regulation

    Posted Apr 20, 2016 by Sean Bennett

    In this six-hour program, health professionals will learn how people reason with selected disorders of mood, anxiety, OCD, anger, and personality. Practical strategies will be presented to facilitate meaningful change in patients and health professionals working in medical, dental, and behavioral health settings.

    Participants completing this program should be able to:...

    Read More

    In this six-hour program, health professionals will learn how people reason with selected disorders of mood, anxiety, OCD, anger, and personality. Practical strategies will be presented to facilitate meaningful change in patients and health professionals working in medical, dental, and behavioral health settings.

    Participants completing this program should be able to:
    1. List several paths to achieving effective emotional communication.
    2. Outline an effective strategy to reason with a person who has a disorder of mood, anxiety, OCD, anger, or personality.
    3. Describe a strategy for reasoning or having a difficult conversation with a person who is experiencing pain, illness or vulnerability.
    4. Describe a calming strategy including the practice of mindfulness for health professionals who are experiencing strong emotions.

    Thursday May 5, 2016 - 8:15 AM
    Ogden, UT
    https://www.ibpceu.com

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  • The Habits of Happy People

    Posted Oct 1, 2015 by Sean Bennett

    November 11, 2015 Salt Lake City, Utah

    Understanding Happiness

    "Happiness depends less on what happens to us and more on how we view the past, enjoy the moment and create the future."
    o The New Science of Happiness: how happiness is defined, measured, and can be meaningfully enhanced.
    o Sources of Happiness: about 50% is genetic, 40% is within our power to change, an...

    Read More

    November 11, 2015 Salt Lake City, Utah

    Understanding Happiness

    “Happiness depends less on what happens to us and more on how we view the past, enjoy the moment and create the future.”
    • The New Science of Happiness: how happiness is defined, measured, and can be meaningfully enhanced.
    • Sources of Happiness: about 50% is genetic, 40% is within our power to change, and only 10% is affected by life circumstances.
    • Unsustainable Sources of Happiness: why improving life circumstances (e.g., income or one’s appearance) does not make us sustainably happier
    due to hedonic adaptation.
    • Habits of Happy People: activities, thoughts, and beliefs that support positive emotions, thoughts, caring, commitment, motivation and
    meaning.
    Happiness and Health
    “Be happy for this moment. This moment is your life.”
    • The Stress-Resistant Mindset: viewing problems as predictable and controllable; protection against the toxic effects of cortisol on the heart,
    immune system, and the brain, e.g., impaired short-term memory.
    • Developing Stress Resilience: how the mastery of mental and physical challenges can prepare us for physical and psychological stressors.
    • Enhancing Physical Resilience: why happy people generally have better sleep, lower blood pressure and blood glucose, and are less likely to
    develop tangles and amyloid plaque related to cognitive decline.

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  • Looking to Further your Nursing Education? Read this:

    Posted Apr 16, 2015 by April Snyder
  • Why are the U.’s nursing programs rejecting qualified applicants?

    Posted Apr 15, 2015 by Garret Armes
  • Mind Over Misery: Reasoning our way through Pain, Stress, Anxiety , Depression and Insomnia

    Posted Apr 13, 2015 by Sean Bennett

    This program describes effective mind-body approaches to overcome stress,
    anxiety, sadness, anger and pain, and highlights methods of elevating positive
    emotions. The presentation also provides an understanding of key brain
    systems underlying each topic.

    When May 13, 2015 Ogden Utah
    May 14, 2015 Provo Utah
    May 15, 2015 Salt Lake City Utah

    For more information and to...

    Read More

    This program describes effective mind-body approaches to overcome stress,
    anxiety, sadness, anger and pain, and highlights methods of elevating positive
    emotions. The presentation also provides an understanding of key brain
    systems underlying each topic.

    When May 13, 2015 Ogden Utah
    May 14, 2015 Provo Utah
    May 15, 2015 Salt Lake City Utah

    For more information and to register go to: www.ibpceu.com

    Read Less
  • Managed Care Nursing: Increase your Value as a Nurse! Visit aamcn.org for more info

    Posted Apr 9, 2015 by April Snyder

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