Tennessee Nursing Network

Tennessee Nursing Network

Welcome

Welcome to the great state of Tennessee's Nurses Lounge.

This Lounge provides a place for Tennessee nursing news, and info from around the state.

As a follower of the Nurses Lounge please feel free to post news, events, photos and/or ask and give and answer questions.

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Welcome to the great state of Tennessee's Nurses Lounge.

This Lounge provides a place for Tennessee nursing news, and info from around the state.

As a follower of the Nurses Lounge please feel free to post news, events, photos and/or ask and give and answer questions.

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  • Nurses Lounge is a significant player in this social media imperative

    Posted Dec 30, 2014 by Adam Burkhart
  • 'American Nurse' screens in Nashville, hosts nurse Q&A

    Posted Nov 25, 2014 by Adam Burkhart

    Nurses, future nurses and their loved ones are invited to the Nashville screening of the documentary "The American Nurse."

    A winner of the American Academy of Nursing's Excellence in Media Award, the film follows five nurses who go above and beyond to care for patients in need.

    After the film, guests can stick around for a Q&A discussion with local health professiona...

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    Nurses, future nurses and their loved ones are invited to the Nashville screening of the documentary "The American Nurse."

    A winner of the American Academy of Nursing's Excellence in Media Award, the film follows five nurses who go above and beyond to care for patients in need.

    After the film, guests can stick around for a Q&A discussion with local health professionals.

    The panel includes Betsy Kennedy of Tennessee Nurses Association, deans Colleen Conway Welch and Mavis Schorn of Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, midwife Carol Etherington of Doctors without Borders, nurse Robertson Nash, and Gina Betts, former commissioner of Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Disabilities under former governor Phil Bredesen.

    READ MORE: 'American Nurse' screens in Nashville, hosts nurse Q&A

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  • Jackson Nurses Volunteer for Special Victims

    Posted Nov 18, 2014 by Adam Burkhart
  • You WILL be Googled!

    Posted Nov 11, 2014 by Adam Burkhart

    A great big welcome to all the recent Tennessee Nursing Network new members!

    Your profile on Nurses Lounge is now your professional calling card online and you want it to be as nice as possible. So be sure to complete your profile and don't forget to add a clear photograph of yourself looking professional.

    You can also create a custom URL with your name in it so that...

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    A great big welcome to all the recent Tennessee Nursing Network new members!

    Your profile on Nurses Lounge is now your professional calling card online and you want it to be as nice as possible. So be sure to complete your profile and don't forget to add a clear photograph of yourself looking professional.

    You can also create a custom URL with your name in it so that when you are Googled (and trust me, you will be), potential employers will see your Nurses Lounge profile before any other social media. To do this, go to the first blue icon in the upper right hand corner. Click on "edit profile picture" and you'll be able to:

    - Add a profile photo
    - Create a custom URL
    - Import your resume from LinkedIn with just a click of a button.

    Any questions, just send me an email at cbrown@nurseslounge.com or through the network. I'm here to help!

    Cam Brown
    Nurses Lounge

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  • Tennessee Nurses Association Enters Partnership with PerformanceScrubs.com

    Posted Oct 8, 2014 by Adam Burkhart

    PerformanceScrubs.com, a Performance HealthCare Products company, today announced a partnership with the Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) to offer their members discounts and to aid in fundraising for their organization.

    Through this cooperative effort, the Tennessee Nurses Association will work closely with PerformanceScrubs.com to offer product discounts on their in...

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    PerformanceScrubs.com, a Performance HealthCare Products company, today announced a partnership with the Tennessee Nurses Association (TNA) to offer their members discounts and to aid in fundraising for their organization.

    Through this cooperative effort, the Tennessee Nurses Association will work closely with PerformanceScrubs.com to offer product discounts on their innovative line of nursing uniforms, in addition to raising money for their organization.

    “We are very excited to partner with PerformanceScrubs.com. The products they have developed represent the next generation of scrubs and uniforms for our members. We are delighted with the professional look, comfort and flexibility of design. The fact that you can customize them, ushers in a whole new era of scrubs,” states Kathy Denton, Manager of Marketing, Member Services and IT.

    “We are thrilled about this new relationship with the Tennessee Nurses Association. As our entire product line is 100% Made in the USA, our partnership with the Tennessee Nurses Association is a perfect fit for our company,” says J. Kirby Best, CEO, PerformanceScrubs.com.

    This announcement follows the recent launch of PerformanceScrubs.com manufacturing facility in Florence, Alabama in August 2014.

    PerformanceScrubs.com are 100% Made in the USA using a high-tech moisture wicking material. The scrubs are wrinkle resistant, stain resistant, and fade resistant, and will keep that new look through dozens of washings. You custom design your own scrubs choosing color, style, pocket positions, size, and trim. You can mix and match colors, trims and ribbons to create literally thousands of looks – over 2.5 million!

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  • Tennessee Nurses Get Positive Feedback on Bill to Expand Their Authority

    Posted Oct 8, 2014 by Adam Burkhart
  • New nursing wing opens at UT Martin Parsons Center

    Posted Sep 5, 2014 by Adam Burkhart

    From The Jackson Sun

    Jessica Brownyard has a lot to say about the UT Martin Parsons Center.

    Brownyard spoke at the July 2013 announcement of the center's new West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing Wing.

    On Thursday, she spoke again at a ribbon-cutting ceremony that officially opened the expansion. Sometime in the future, she can say that she's among the firs...

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    From The Jackson Sun

    Jessica Brownyard has a lot to say about the UT Martin Parsons Center.

    Brownyard spoke at the July 2013 announcement of the center's new West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation Nursing Wing.

    On Thursday, she spoke again at a ribbon-cutting ceremony that officially opened the expansion. Sometime in the future, she can say that she's among the first to graduate from the center's new Bachelor of Science in Nursing program housed in the facility.

    Brownyard joined University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro, UT Martin Chancellor Tom Rakes, Jim and Janet Ayers of the Ayers Foundation, local and state elected officials and others to celebrate the expansion's completion. The 30-minute program later moved from the Parsons Center's main entrance to the new nursing wing, complete with its own entrance and a large water fountain to welcome students and visitors. Ribbon was cut at the entrance, and a reception and tours followed. The official opening of the wing came as the Parsons Center has reached an all-time enrollment record of 325 students for fall semester.

    Kelli Deere, center director, welcomed the overflow crowd and recognized the partnership among the UT Martin Parsons Center, the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation and the state of Tennessee for making the expansion possible. She specifically thanked Gov. Bill Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly for supporting the project, which was completed by TLM Associates, of Jackson, and Quinn Construction, of Parsons.

    Initial funding for the expansion was included in the 2013-14 state budget, and a $1 million appropriation was made to build a 10,000-square-foot addition to the center. The project received added support when the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation also made a $1 million commitment to the project. The addition includes classrooms, a skills laboratory and a high-fidelity computerized simulation laboratory.

    Rakes also expressed appreciation to all who made the project possible. He reminded the audience that the university is bringing a high-quality BSN program to the center as he told of 2014 nursing graduates achieving a 100 percent pass rate on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses.

    "We feel fortunate to partner with this community, this region of the state, certainly with West Tennessee Healthcare," Rakes said. "We appreciate the relationships with our legislators, and we don't take it for granted because it doesn't happen automatically."

    DiPietro compared the new nursing wing to the time when he and other University of Illinois veterinary science faculty members moved to a new large animal hospital. He recalled that the move "changed how we felt about ourselves. It changed how we were able to train our students. It changed the spirit of the organization to focus on getting even better." He sees the expansion having the same potential impact for the Parsons Center.

    DiPietro kept the focus on students and introduced Brownyard, who was accepted to begin the nursing program this fall.

    "I never thought that in my wildest dreams that I would get to graduate from the UT Martin Parsons Center," Brownyard said. "And now I will get to be one of the first ever to graduate from the new BSN program."

    She thanked Jim and Janet Ayers and the Ayers Foundation for helping her "through every single semester of college" and said, "This new addition gives so many students the hope that one day that they can graduate while still staying close to home and saving a little bit of money."

    Harbert Alexander Jr., chairman of the West Tennessee Healthcare Foundation board, talked about the nursing program's future impact on the region. He also acknowledged the Ayerses for challenging the foundation "to step up and commit to the largest project that we've ever tried to accomplish."

    A surprise ending to the program came when Jo Ann Ayers Lynn, sister of Jim Ayers, and Rakes unveiled a bust of the businessman and philanthropist.

    "This is a wonderful honor that, I promise you, I don't deserve," a grateful Ayers said. Janet Ayers followed her husband to the podium a short time later and said, "Jim, you are deserving of a lot of attention and a lot of recognition, …" but added that one person can't achieve things alone.

    "It is a whole community that comes together to make things like this (the Parsons Center) happen," she said.

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  • Bullying a Rising Concern for New Nurses

    Posted Sep 5, 2014 by Adam Burkhart

    From U.S. News and World Report

    For new nurses, a supportive, low-stress work environment is absolutely crucial to ensuring their success. Their first year of practice is a time for acquiring essential skills, building on their practical knowledge and boosting their confidence. Unfortunately, their vulnerability puts them at risk for bullying, an increasingly prevalent...

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    From U.S. News and World Report

    For new nurses, a supportive, low-stress work environment is absolutely crucial to ensuring their success. Their first year of practice is a time for acquiring essential skills, building on their practical knowledge and boosting their confidence. Unfortunately, their vulnerability puts them at risk for bullying, an increasingly prevalent threat that could compromise those developmental opportunities.

    Rising Worries

    A new survey of over 2,000 nursing school graduates from the class of 2014 from Kaplan Test Prep revealed that this issue is breeding fear. A staggering 48% of participants admitted they are concerned about being the victims of workplace bullying or working in a hostile environment, according to the press release. This finding should come as no surprise considering 39% of those who answered the survey knew nurses who had experienced these conditions.

    Another study in American Nurse Today revealed that roughly 60% of nurses left their first job in just six months due to bullying or a hostile work environment. Medical providers then suffer the consequences: Related research published in The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing showed that this can cost them from $22,000 to $64,4000 or more per turnover.

    Susan Sanders, DNP, RN, NEA-BC and vice president of nursing, Kaplan Test Prep, commented on this "disturbing dynamic" in the press release.

    MORE Bullying a Rising Concern for New Nurses

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  • Nearly One in Five New Nurses Leave First Job Within a Year, According to Survey of Newly-Licensed Registered Nurses

    Posted Sep 4, 2014 by Adam Burkhart

    Turnover of registered nurses (RNs) is an important and widely used measure in analyzing the health care workforce. It's used to project the job market for nurses (based on availability of jobs) and can also be considered an indicator of whether a health care organization has a good working environment.
    A study in the current issue of Policy, Politics & Nursing Practice re...

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    Turnover of registered nurses (RNs) is an important and widely used measure in analyzing the health care workforce. It’s used to project the job market for nurses (based on availability of jobs) and can also be considered an indicator of whether a health care organization has a good working environment.
    A study in the current issue of Policy, Politics & Nursing Practice reveals that an estimated 17.5 percent of newly-licensed RNs leave their first nursing job within the first year and one in three (33.5%) leave within two years. The researchers found that turnover for this group is lower at hospitals than at other health care settings.
    The study, which synthesized existing turnover data and reported turnover data from a nationally representative sample of RNs, was conducted by the RN Work Project, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. It is the only longitudinal study of RNs in the United States. The data comes from surveys of three cohorts of newly-licensed RNs conducted since 2006.
    Registered nurses (RNs) leaving their jobs (RN turnover) is costly for hospitals and also affects quality of care. Organizational costs associated with RN turnover can be as much as $6.4 million for a large acute care hospital, and studies have associated turnover among health providers with an increase in the use of physical restraints, pressure ulcers and patient falls.
    The RN Work Project is directed by Christine T. Kovner, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor at the College of Nursing, New York University (NYU); and Carol Brewer, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor at the School of Nursing, University at Buffalo. Other investigators for this study were Farida Fatehi, MS, BDS, data analyst at New York University; and Jin Jun, MSN, APRN, CCRN, research assistant at also at the College of Nursing at NYU.
    The authors point out many of the problems with existing turnover numbers in the literature.
    “One of the biggest problems we face in trying to assess the impact of nurse turnover on our health care system as a whole is that there’s not a single, agreed-upon definition of turnover,” said Kovner. “In order to make comparisons across organizations and geographical areas, researchers, policy makers and others need valid and reliable data based on consistent definitions of turnover. It makes sense to look at RNs across multiple organizations, as we did, rather than in a single organization or type of organization to get an accurate picture of RN turnover.”
    The research team noted that there are different kinds of turnover, and that in some cases, RN turnover can actually be helpful. In cases of functional turnover, a poorly functioning employee leaves, as opposed to dysfunctional turnover, when well-performing employees leave. Authors recommend that organizations pay attention to the kind of turnover occurring, and point that their data indicate that when most RNs leave their jobs, they go to another health care job.
    “Developing a standard definition of turnover would go a long way in helping identify the reasons for RN turnover and whether managers should be concerned about their institutions’ turnover rates,” said Brewer. “A high rate of turnover at a hospital, if it’s voluntary, could be problematic, but if it’s involuntary or if nurses are moving within the hospital to another unit or position, that tells a very different story.”
    The RN Work Project’s data include all organizational turnover (voluntary and involuntary), but do not include position turnover if the RN stayed at the same health care organization.
    The RN Work Project is a 10-year study of NLRNs that began in 2006. It is the only multi-state, longitudinal study of new nurses’ turnover rates, intentions and attitudes—including intent, satisfaction, organizational commitment, and preferences about work. The study draws on data from nurses in 34 states, covering 51 metropolitan areas and nine rural areas.

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  • UT Now Offers Nursing Leadership Program

    Posted Aug 26, 2014 by Adam Burkhart

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